How to Choose The Right Scooter For Your Kid

You love your children like nothing and no one else in the world. Sure, your parents told you that one day you would understand their sometimes maddening obsession with your safety, but you didn’t believe them until now. When you buy your child a water bottle you check that it is BPA free. When you get clothing for your child you make sure the fibers won’t irritate your child’s skin. When you shop for food you scrupulously check for anything to which your child may be allergic. You have seen others’ children having a ball on kick scooters, but you’ve also heard stories about kids getting injured or just falling out of love with the activity. You are at a crossroads.

Today you are considering buying your child a toy that will keep them active and healthy. You’re considering buying a kick scooter for them. You want what’s best for them, but sometimes it is difficult to feel like you know which product is right for them because “right for them” can mean so many things.

Kick scooters really took off in popularity in the 1990s with ones built for adults. These scooters occupied the niche needed to get commuters from public transportation to their offices when bicycles and roller skates were out of the question. They were also pretty cool and, like skateboards, they inspired daredevils to attempt tricks on them. This made them appealing to children and soon kids across America wanted their own kick scooters.

The rise in popularity of kick scooters was good for Americans’ health. It inspired people who didn’t have space for bicycles to get some aerobic exercise. It made a little workout possible for normal people every day. It got people thinking more about transportation alternatives. Perhaps its biggest impact was on the health of children who perhaps wouldn’t have otherwise been so excited about getting outside and breaking a sweat.

Features to Look For in Your Kid’s Next Scooter

kick scooter features

When it comes to buying a kick scooter for any child, safety should be your first concern. There are many details to consider. First, where will your child use the kick scooter? Assuming they will use it on a quiet side street, a driveway or a park, you’ll want something that isn’t too complicated and can withstand a lot of punishment. If a kick scooter falls apart under your child, then your child will take a fall as well. A reinforced deck, hardened metal tube construction and sturdy hand grips are all details for which you should keep an eye out.

Portability may be a concern if your child will ride their kick scooter someplace to which you will travel by car or airplane. Portability can come with a cost, as it will mean having to change the size and shape of the kick scooter, requiring that the scooter have some way of not being in the rigid position it takes when riding— a sacrifice. Mechanisms that make this change easy can also mean accidental activation when riding the kick scooter, so you should choose carefully. While folding kick scooters exist, they are best left to adults. Children might mishandle the folding mechanism and accidentally injure themselves while riding insufficiently locked together scooters.

On the other hand, there are scooters that, rather than folding, disassemble. This may mean slightly more effort to reassemble for use (usually just reattaching the handlebars) but it will be the adult doing it, so you can be totally sure it is done correctly.

Kick Scooter Benefits

A scooter should suit the child’s age group, both in terms of size and in terms of style. Obviously any kick scooter should suit a child’s height and build, but if the kick scooter doesn’t say “fun” to them, they won’t want to ride it. The best kick scooter is the one your child rides. Riding the kick scooter will mean becoming more coordinated and athletic, which will help prevent injury and improve overall health. Associating “working out” with fun is a healthy thing for a child to do, as it will promote better, healthier habits later in life.

Aside from appealing to a child’s sense of fun and a parent’s need for safety, there are details that make a child’s kick scooter idea. This is where the GOMO Kids Scooter shines. In addition to a handlebar column that is sturdy and does not fold, its deck is made of reinforced plastics, its frame is made of strong tubes of metal, its grips are firm and satisfying to hold, and it even has a soft nose, so if your kid decides to ride the kick scooter in the house, they won’t smash up the walls and furniture (with the nose, at least).

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